Accessibility Inspector; CASp Consultant


Steve Arnold history of accessibility experience;

EDUCATION
Chabot College – Hayward, CA  1998
• Building Inspector – Plumbing Inspector – Electrical Inspector – Mechanical Inspector
2010 Certified Access Specialist – CASp #215
EXPERIENCE
Home Inspector  1991 – Present (Bay Area, CA)
• Inspect homes for pre-purchase or pre-sale defects. Construction consultant.
Housing Inspector  1994 – 1996 (Alameda County, CA)
• Inspect subsidized housing units for minimum HQS (Housing Quality Standards).
Lead Poisoning Prevention Specialist  1996 – 1997 (Alameda County, CA)
• Inspect homes of lead poisoned children for lead remediation work.
Building Inspector  1997 – 1999 (Alameda County, CA)
• Inspect residential and commercial construction projects including accessibility.
Building Inspector  1999 – 2007 (Contra Costa County, CA)
• Inspect residential and commercial construction projects including accessibility.
Building Inspector  2007 – Present (City of Walnut Creek, CA)
• Inspect residential and commercial construction projects including accessibility.
CASp Inspector  2010 – Present (Bay Area, CA)
• Inspect residential and commercial structures for ABA, ADA, UFAS, CBC compliance per SB 1608
SKILLS
General Contractor B599281, Home Inspector, Building Inspector, CASp Inspector, Construction Consultant.
• I have over 20 years experience working with building owners, tenants, and contractors.

Summary
Being a building inspector, I understand the limitations of the building departments ability
to enforce Federal Laws i.e. ABA, UFAS, ADA. Construction in California is required to comply
with CBC in effect at time of permit application and accessibility improvements have triggers
based on type of construction or alteration, construction cost, topography limitations,
unreasonable hardship exemptions, etc.

Being a CASp inspector, I have become fully aware of the Federal laws as well as State
laws regarding “Readily Achievable Removable Barriers” and “Reasonable Equivalent
Facilitation”. In most cases, a transition plan for full Access Compliance is provided in the
Access Compliance Survey, allowing the owner/tenant to establish a budget and plan for
full compliance without going out of business. In my opinion, the goal of construction
related accessibility laws are to provide fair and equal access to everyone when feasible.